‘The Hilarious World of Depression’ by John Moe

tHWoD-MoeThe Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe is the radio personality’s first foray into writing. Part memoir, part self-help, Moe’s book combines real-life experience with a sort of analysis of the knowledge gained from that experience.

Moe tells not only his own story in The Hilarious World of Depression, but the stories of his family and a slew of famous people who have been featured on his podcast by the same title. Moe delves into the topic of depression and how it has affected him, his family, and others head-on with comedy as his sidekick. One of the repeated themes in the memoir is how humor has been used for generations to combat trauma. Moe interviews a variety of comedians who have suffered from depression and finds solace in the traits, ideas, and experiences that they all share.

Aside from the relationship between humor and depression, The Hilarious World of Depression also covers topics of intergenerational trauma, micro-traumas, suicide, and more. Reading the book, one gets the sense that for much of his life, Moe was actually fairly well off. But that’s part of his point: depression doesn’t care if your life is middle-class, mediocre, or actually going pretty well. Later, when Moe’s own brother is claimed by suicide, Moe delves into the effect external circumstances can have on an already inherently challenged mindset.

The Hilarious World of Depression is a book that explores important, often undiscussed topics with ease and a healthy dose of humor.

Slated for release by St. Martin’s Press on May 5, 2020, you can preorder a copy of The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe from your local independent bookstore.

Read more non-fiction book reviews at Centered on Books.

FTC Disclaimer: This book was given to me in return for a fair and honest review of the text.

‘The Island of Always’ by Stephen Evans

the-island-of-always-evans

Stephen Evan’s the The Island of Always is the continuation of his acclaimed novel The Marriage of True Minds originally published in 2008.

The books’ protagonists, Lena and Nick, are partners? Lovers? Enemies? Divorced? Even that’s a question. The two, it seems, are constantly trying to figure out what they are to each other. All they know is that they love each other (most of the time) and they can’t seem to live without each other, except when they are driving each other literally or metaphorically insane. Both are environmental attorneys who once owned a law practice together fighting the injustices of Minneapolis’ less enlightened. Then they got divorced, and either before or after the divorce, Nick might have developed a mental illness.

At the outset of The Marriage of True Minds (which is also included in this edition of The Island of Always), Nick is committed to a mental institution after relocating 144 lobsters to the mayor of Minneapolis’ personal pool. This kicks off a new chapter in Nick and Lena’s romantic comedy as they realize that despite their short comings, they may still love each other.

An echo to Cervantes’ Don Quixote in more than one way, The Island of Always, while comedic and lighthearted in most of its telling, does explore some deeper themes. Evan’s seems to suggest that the definition of insanity may be fluid, indefinable really, human-made definitely. Similarly, love is equally indefinable, always illusive, and never perfect, normal, or what you expected.

Evan’s brings his experience as a playwright into the novel with his descriptive and vivid sentences. The reader can always see the character: exactly what she’s doing and the emotions crossing her face. A fun and utterly enjoyable read, The Island of Always is the perfect feel-good book to boost your spirits and make you think a little differently about your life, even if only for a moment.

Slated for release by Time Being Media, LLC in January of 2019, you can preorder a copy of The Island of Always from your local bookstore.

Read more fiction book reviews at Centered on Books.

FTC Disclaimer: This book was given to me in return for a fair and honest review of the text.